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Rifle & Drill

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Rifle & Drill
Leonaur Original
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Author(s): S. Bertram Browne
Date Published: 2011/09
Page Count: 152
Softcover ISBN-13: 978-0-85706-634-3
Hardcover ISBN-13: 978-0-85706-633-6

Soldiers and their weapons

These two military instruction guides have been published together because they are the work of a common author, S. Bertram Browne, and because both concern aspects of the business of soldiering from the perspective of ordinary soldiers in the British Army of mid nineteenth century. The young Queen Victoria came to the throne in 1837 and by the time the new Enfield Rifle Musket was introduced, some sixteen years later, her armies were engaged in colonial wars across the world and were on the verge of substantial conflicts in the Crimea and India. Their weapon was a .577 calibre muzzle loading ‘Minie’ rifle-musket of the type used by the British Army until 1867, when it was replaced by (or in many cases converted to) the cartridge-loading Snider Enfield rifle. The Enfield Rifle Musket was used by several armies and was notably employed in the Crimea and the New Zealand Wars by the British. Its particular notoriety arises from the Indian Mutiny, for it was this weapon—especially the method of loading it and the pig fat that allegedly protected the cartridge, thus defiling their caste—that has been cited as one of the principal causes of disaffection among the ranks of the Bengal Army, the outbreak of mutiny and its rapid spread. The Enfield Rifle Musket was also used in the American Civil War where, among others, Chamberlain’s legendary 20th Maine were armed with it as they defended Little Round Top at Gettysburg. This ‘companion’ naturally explains to the reader everything about the gun’s, use, care, construction and maintenance. The second guide in this volume contains a very interesting text best defined by its title and includes many diagrams which will be informative to the student of the period and instructive for re-enactors etc.
Leonaur editions are newly typeset and are not facsimiles; each title is available in softcover and hardback with dustjacket.

In going through the turnings, the left heel must never quit the ground; but the soldier must turn on it as on a pivot, the right foot being drawn back to turn the body to the right, and carried forward to turn it to the left; the body must incline forward, the knees being kept straight.<br>
In the first of all the following motions, the foot is to be carried back, or brought forward, without a jerk, the movement being from the hip; so that the body may be kept perfectly steady until it commences to turn.<br>
Right-Turn.—On the word “Turn,” place the hollow of the right foot smartly against the left heel, keeping the shoulders square to the front.<br>
Two.—On the word “Two” raise the toes, and turn a quarter circle to the right on both heels, which must be pressed together.<br>
Left-Turn.—On the word “Turn,” place the right heel against the hollow of the left foot, keeping the shoulders square to the front.<br>
Two.—On the word “Two,” raise the toes, and turn a quarter circle to the left on both heels, which must be pressed together.<br>
Right about-Turn.—On the word “Turn,” place the ball of the right toe against the left heel, keeping the shoulders square to the front.<br>
Two.—On the word “Two” raise the toes, and turn to the right about on both heels.<br>
Three.—On the word “Three,” bring the right foot smartly back in a line with the left.<br>
Left about-Turn.—On the word “Turn,” place the right heel against the ball of the left toe, keeping the shoulders square to the front.<br>
Two.—On the word “Two,” raise the toes, and turn to the left about on both heels.<br>
Three.—On the word “Three,” bring up the right foot smartly in a line with the left.<br>
Half-Right (or Left)-Turn.—On the word “Turn,” draw back (or advance) the right foot one inch.<br>
Two.—On the word “Two,” raise the toes and turn half right (or left) on both heels.<br>
Three-quarters-Right (or Left) about-Turn. Two. Three.—Make a three-quarters turn in the given direction in the same manner as in turning about.<br>
Squad-Front.—After any of the foregoing turnings, the word “Front” may be given, on which the whole will turn, as accurately as possible, to their former front.<br>
When the soldier has previously turned about, he will always front by the right about. But if he has turned to the three-quarters right about, he will front by the three-quarters left about; and vice versa.<br>
At squad drill with intervals, the turnings will always be done by numbers, except when the word “Front” is given, in which case the soldier will judge the time, which must be a pause of slow time after each motion.